Back
Tekke Turkmen Chuval, Central Asia, 19th Century, 3’5” x 2’6”

Weavings attributable to the Tekke become increasingly more difficult to find even though they were one of the dominant tribes of the area  ...
Tekke Turkmen Chuval, Central Asia, 19th Century, 3’5” x 2’6”

Weavings attributable to the Tekke become increasingly more difficult to find even though they were one of the dominant tribes of the area  ...
Tekke Turkmen Chuval, Central Asia, 19th Century, 3’5” x 2’6”

Weavings attributable to the Tekke become increasingly more difficult to find even though they were one of the dominant tribes of the area  ...
Tekke Turkmen Chuval, Central Asia, 19th Century, 3’5” x 2’6”

Weavings attributable to the Tekke become increasingly more difficult to find even though they were one of the dominant tribes of the area  ...
Tekke Turkmen Chuval, Central Asia, 19th Century, 3’5” x 2’6”

Weavings attributable to the Tekke become increasingly more difficult to find even though they were one of the dominant tribes of the area  ...
Tekke Turkmen Chuval, Central Asia, 19th Century, 3’5” x 2’6”

Weavings attributable to the Tekke become increasingly more difficult to find even though they were one of the dominant tribes of the area  ...
Tekke Turkmen Chuval, Central Asia, 19th Century, 3’5” x 2’6”

Weavings attributable to the Tekke become increasingly more difficult to find even though they were one of the dominant tribes of the area  ...
Tekke Turkmen Chuval, Central Asia, 19th Century, 3’5” x 2’6”

Weavings attributable to the Tekke become increasingly more difficult to find even though they were one of the dominant tribes of the area we call Turkmenistan today. Except for the ubiquitous six gol Tekke torbas and a few smaller mafrash and the turreted gol chuvals, chuvals with larger gols as well as those of the small gol format seen here are rare these days, with most of the better examples residing in private collections.

The design here is lovely, with none of the stiff qualities that seem to prevail, at times, within the small 'gol' design, which frankly has never been one of my favorites. This one, though, is quite pleasing to my eye. The secondary gols, connected by a vertical line, appear to be lightly suspended from a wire, allowing them to twist and turn just slightly, affording a sense of movement to the composition. The static quality of drawing long associated with Turkmen weaving by those with no real affection for the art form is absent, thankfully.

The borders are nice and the elem is quite spaciously rendered, again with the treatment of the 'limbs' of the trees imparting a sense of movement, as if wafting in a slight breeze.

The condition is relatively good, original sides are missing, there is a bit of wear at the top end (see detail image), the weave is fine, and there are no holes or repairs. The colors are well saturated, clear and beautiful with no ‘smoked’ affect, and are all derived from natural dyes.

price:  Please inquire, you might be pleasantly surprised?